How to hang and dispose of Tibetan prayer flags respectfully

Every so often we receive messages about how to hang and dispose of Tibetan prayer flags respectfully.

Tibetan prayer flags are used to promote peace, compassion, strength, and wisdom. Tibetans believe the prayers and mantras will be spread by the wind and bring good will and compassion to benefit all beings.

prayer flags, how to dispose of Tibetan prayer flags,

Tibetan nuns at Dolma Ling Nunnery in India remove and burn old prayer flags and set up new ones to mark Losar, Tibetan New Year. Photo courtesy of Olivier Adam

Prayer flags are made of block-printed fabric using traditional printing techniques going back hundreds of years. The Tibetan Buddhist nuns at Dolma Ling Nunnery in India have been making prayer flags for many years. We sell these specially blessed objects through our online store and the revenue helps provide food, health care, shelter, and education for the over 230 nuns who live at the nunnery, as well as to help support around 500 nuns at six other nunneries in India.

Some people have asked whether it is appropriate for non-Buddhists to display Tibetan prayer flags. Yes, it is fine for non-Buddhists to display Tibetan prayer flags.

When raising prayer flags it is important to have a good motivation. One should not have selfish or limiting thoughts. When hanging prayer flags one should wish that all beings everywhere will benefit and find happiness.

prayer flags, burning prayer flags, Tibetan Nuns Project, how to dispose of old prayer flags

Being careful not to let the old prayer flags touch the ground, a Tibetan Buddhist nun burns the flags while wishing to end the suffering of all sentient beings. Photo courtesy of Olivier Adam

Tibetan tradition considers prayer flags to be holy. The flags contain sacred texts and symbols and should be treated respectfully. They should not be placed on the ground or put in the trash.

When disposing of old prayer flags one should burn them so that the smoke may carry their blessings to the heavens. Do not let prayer flags touch the ground as they are burned.

As you are burning the prayer flags, you should try to remember the intentions with which the prayer flags were made and blessed and have compassion for all sentient beings.

hanging new prayer flags, Tibetan prayer flags, Tibetan Nuns Project

A Tibetan Buddhist nun at Dolma Ling Nunnery hangs new prayer flags at Losar, Tibetan New Year. Traditionally, prayer flags are hung outside so the wind can carry the prayers to the world for the benefit of all sentient beings. Photo courtesy of Olivier Adam.

You may also choose to let your old Tibetan prayer flags fade and disintegrate naturally, hanging new prayer flags up with old ones. The contrast between old and new prayer flags is a reminder of impermanence and the continuing cycle of birth and death.

The traditional cotton prayer flags, like those made by the nuns at Dolma Ling and sold in our online store, fade more quickly than synthetic ones and may be safely burned. The fact that they do not last is part of their nature and is a reminder of the central Buddhist teaching of impermanence.

Traditionally, Tibetan prayer flags come in sets of five, with one flag in each of five colors, left to right in this specific order: blue, white, red, green, and yellow. The five colors represent the elements: blue symbolizes the sky and space, white symbolizes the air and wind, red symbolizes fire, green symbolizes water, and yellow symbolizes earth.

Another question that we’ve received about Tibetan prayer flag protocol is whether it is OK to disassemble them and use them separately, or do they have to be displayed together in a row so that all the elements are represented. We would suggest that it is better not to take apart the set of prayer flags. They are meant to represent the five elements in balance and it is not really appropriate to the purpose or culture to separate them.

You can buy Tibetan prayer flags through the Tibetan Nuns Project online store. They come in a variety of types and sizes of prayer flags as follows:

Windhorse Tibetan prayer flagsWindhorse Prayer Flags

The Wind Horse or Lung-ta is the most prevalent symbol used on prayer flags. In the center of the prayer flag is a powerful horse (lung-ta) bearing three flaming jewels on its back. These jewels represent the Buddha, the Dharma (Buddhist teachings), and the Sangha (Buddhist community) which are the three cornerstones of Tibetan philosophical tradition. The horse (Ta) is a symbol of speed and the transformation of bad fortune to good fortune. Surrounding the Lung ta are mantras and Buddhist sacred symbols. In the corners of the prayer flags are images four powerful animals, also known as the Four Dignities: the dragon, the garuda, the tiger, and the snow lion. Windhorse prayer flags made by the nuns are available in three sizes. Buy Windhorse Prayer flags here.

Tara Tibetan Prayer flagsTara Prayer Flags

Tara represents virtuous and enlightened action. It is said that her compassion for living beings is stronger than a mother’s love for her children. She also brings about longevity, protects earthly travel, and guards her followers on their spiritual journey to enlightenment. The Tara prayer flags have a lovely image of Tara in the center.  You can order Tara prayer flags in three sizes here.

Guru Rinpoche prayer flagsGuru Rinpoche Prayer Flags

Padmasambhava, the renowned saint of the eighth century, was a central figure in shaping Buddhism’s history in Tibet. Revered as the second Buddha, Guru Rinpoche (Precious Guru) conquered the local deities and demons of Tibet and bound them by oath to become guardians of Buddhism. Purchase Guru Rinpoche prayer flags in three sizes here.

Gyaltsen Tsenpo Tibetan Prayer flagsGyaltsen Tsenpo Prayer Flags

This is a common prayer flag, especially at New Year, symbolizing new ventures and beginnings. Gyaltsen Tsenpo prayer flags are printed with sutras bestowed by Lord Buddha to Indra, king of the gods to overcome his enemies and achieve victory. Order Gyaltsen Tsenpo prayer flags in three sizes here.

103 thoughts on “How to hang and dispose of Tibetan prayer flags respectfully

  1. Myrna E Diaz

    How to dispose of synthetic cloth (not cotton) prayer flags? I’ve been told synthetic material should’nt be burned because of harm to the environment. Can you give some advise? Thank you.

    Reply
    1. Cameron

      This is something in my tradition to think about, as recommended by Lama Zopa Rinpoche. When we have anything that has holy images or texts- mainly the images. So this could be photos, prayer flags, thangkas, etc. It had been advised to make a wooden enclosure or something to protect the damaged holy objects and this could be placed in the forest as a sort of shrine house. I know this this is not advisable for everyone, but if you have some woods or perhaps even just and undisturbed part of your land this could be a viable option.

      Reply
      1. Patricia

        How wonderful! We have 20 Acres half of which is left to nature. I truly love this idea to give thanks to our well being and compassion for all life!

        Reply
    2. kunga paljyor

      PLEASE DO NOT BURN PLASTIC FLAGS OR ROPE

      One: it is bad for yourselves and the environment;
      Two: there are powerful beings around who will be utterly provoked and create all sorts of calamities.

      Thank you.

      Reply
        1. Tibetan Nuns Project Post author

          Tibetans do not wash prayer flags. They are not created to be washed, but rather hung in place where the prayers will blow in the wind. Eventually, the prayer flags will fade and can be replaced with new prayer flags.

          Reply
    1. Kunga Paljyor

      PLEASE DO NOT BURN PLASTIC FLAGS OR ROPE

      One: it is bad for yourselves and the environment;
      Two: there are powerful beings around who will be utterly provoked and create all sorts of calamities.

      Thank you.

      SAME OF COURSE APPLIES TO
      KHATAS.
      THEY ARE ALL PLASTIC NOWADAYS

      Reply
  2. Maura Daly

    Interested in ideas for respectful, environmentally safe disposal of ok prayer flags and katas. With so many now made from synthetics, safe, respectful disposal has become a real challenge.

    Reply
    1. Tibetan Nuns Project Post author

      Yes, these are excellent questions and we are writing to the nuns to get the very best answers to them. We’ll post the answers as soon as possible.

      Reply
      1. Tibetan Nuns Project Post author

        Hello Maura, We have consulted the nuns about disposing of prayer flags. The issue of burning synthetic prayer flags doesn’t not really come up for them because their prayer flags, like the ones we sell in our online store, are made of cotton. Also, in India, there has been less awareness around the health and environmental concerns about burning synthetic material. One option is to take the synthetic prayer flags to a place in nature and tie them on a tree somewhere. If that is not possible, then you can bury them underground in a clean place. The key is to try to dispose of your prayer flags with the greatest respect possible.

        Reply
          1. Dr MiXu

            Miss Jennifer,
            Generally, plastic is a pollutant to the environment once it is allowed to be free within it. This is because, unfortunately, plastic does not biodegrade, which is to say it does not break down into its atomic components (ie, carbon, water, etc). Instead, it remains as plastic in smaller and smaller pieces, causing harm by entering water supplies and food systems. Therefore, burying it in the ground ensures that its components cannot be released into these vital global systems.
            Blessings.

  3. Myrna E Diaz

    Quite some time ago I was assigned to dispose of some hundreds of wood malas that had been blessed by HH 17th Gyalwang Karmapa Ogyen Trinley Dorje. The beads were rotten by insects and their strings were breaking into pieces. It took about 4 hrs to take out all (synthetic) strings from the beads. Then they were to be safely put back in the forest, after doing some Medicine Buddha mantras, blowing on them, pouring some saffron water over and making some dedications. I was told these insects feed on dead wood so as not to harm the living trees. This was finally done today after pondering the best way to do that, eliminating the options of discarding them in the sea or the river. But still I was left with the blessed strings. My friend’s husband, a Tibetan ex-monk, then said it was best to bury them as burning was not advisable. Luckily he agreed to do that in their back yard. So I thought, when the time comes, this might be the way to dispose of the (synthetic) prayer flags now hanging on my patio tree! Please, give me your thoughts on this final solution. Thank you and Tashi Delek.

    Reply
    1. Tibetan Nuns Project Post author

      Hello Myrna, Thank you for sharing the story about the malas. Very interesting and also challenging. Since you have some synthetic prayer flags hanging on your patio now, when you want to replace them, perhaps you can take the old ones out into a forest or natural place and hang them on a tree. If that is not possible, then you can bury them underground in a clean place as you did with the blessed cords from the mala. The key is, as you clearly know, to try to dispose of prayer flags with the greatest respect possible. If you’d like to receive our monthly e-updates with news, you can sign up here: https://tnp.org/mailinglist/ Warmest wishes.

      Reply
      1. Yasmin Stonebanks

        We should perhaps all just buy prayer flags that are made of 100% natural fibres. That way we will not have a problem if disposal. It better stills, just tie up the new ones next to the old.

        Reply
  4. deepa

    i have hung a prayer flag inside the car recently i bought new prayer flag little big in size .. so my question is the flag which i have removed can be hung outside my house

    Reply
    1. Tibetan Nuns Project Post author

      Yes, you can hang the prayers outside your house. When you move the prayer flags, do so respectfully and do not let them touch the ground.

      Reply
  5. Janice Jennings

    I really appreciated these teachings about prayer flags. Fortunately, mine are all cotton, because I’ve ordered them from the Tibetan Nuns Project store. They hang in the garden where they gently fade and fray and beautifully demonstrate impermanence. Thank you.

    Reply
  6. Nola

    The order of colours is facing which way …or does it not matter.
    My flags face the street so is it blue first from my right facing out when putting them up ?

    Reply
    1. Tibetan Nuns Project Post author

      The five colors are arranged in a specific order from left to right: blue, white, red, green, and yellow.

      Reply
      1. Sharon

        I understand the order and colour of the flags but does it matter if the blue flag is first when hanging them or the yellow flag first ending with the blue?

        Reply
        1. Tibetan Nuns Project Post author

          Traditionally, Tibetan prayer flags are hung left to right in this specific order: blue, white, red, green, and yellow. You can hang them with the printed prayers facing the direction you want.

          Reply
  7. PJ

    We are moving and our old prayer flags need to be taken down. Can I do this on any day, or are there specific days one should take down prayer flags?

    Reply
  8. Janet

    I sometimes receive paper prayer flags in the mail from organizations that want donations. Do I really need to burn these? I don’t even know how to do this responsibly. I don’t want to keep the prayer flags just because they were sent to me unsolicited but I don’t want to throw them in the trash or recycling. They’re made of paper and I think I’d need separate them and pull out the string in order to recycle them.

    Reply
    1. Tibetan Nuns Project Post author

      Janet, thanks for your question. Perhaps you can give the prayer flags to someone who would like them. If you’re unable to do this, just dispose of them as respectfully as possible.

      Reply
  9. Janet

    Thank you so much for your reply. Maybe I will put them in a bag for Goodwill or another place that accepts donations. Or if that doesn’t feel right, I might put them into the recycling bin so that at least they can be turned into something useful rather than being thrown in the trash.

    Reply
    1. Tibetan Nuns Project Post author

      Dear Leslie, It’s not a bad thing to hang prayer flags indoors. In fact, we have them hanging in our office in Seattle and we have had for years. However, they are really meant to be hung outside where the winds can carry their prayers to all sentient beings.

      Reply
    1. Tibetan Nuns Project Post author

      Yes, we don’t think that is a problem. We hope your move is smooth and happy.

      Reply
    1. Tibetan Nuns Project Post author

      The most critical thing about hanging prayer flags is one’s intention. His Holiness the Dalai Lama says that our motivation, to end the suffering of sentient beings, is the most important thing. Tibetans do hang prayer flags on auspicious days, thereby multiplying the merit and impact of hanging the prayer flags. These times include Tibetan New Year and the two weeks that follow it and Saga Dawa (the fourth month of the Tibetan Lunar calendar), particularly Saga Dawa Duchen, the most holy day (the 15th day of the 4th lunar month) which marks the Buddha’s birth, enlightenment, and paranirvana. Other auspicious days are those connected with the Buddha’s life and teaching. We’re putting together our 2019 Tibetan Nuns Project calendar which will have the important Tibetan Buddhist days marked.

      Reply
  10. Billy Chew

    What if in the process of hanging the prayer flags, they accidentally touched the ground, should I respectably burn them and get new ones?

    Reply
    1. Tibetan Nuns Project Post author

      Thanks for your question, Billy. No you do not have to burn them and get replacements. If they touch the ground accidentally, just collect them and touch them to your forehead a few times, saying a short prayer (like “Om mani padme hum”) with sincerity and the wish to end suffering for all sentient beings. The intention is the most important thing.

      Reply
    1. Tibetan Nuns Project Post author

      Thank you for your comment, Caitlin, and your wish to donate prayer flags. Perhaps there is a Buddhist temple or meditation center near you that you can give them to.

      Reply
  11. Mariah Matteson

    I have a large patio awning with wide support poles along it’s perimeter where I would like to hang my prayer flags. Is it ok if the few flags which will hang against the wide support poles don’t get to blow in the wind as much as the other flags?

    Reply
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  13. dipmoina dowarah

    What is order of single colour vertical prayer flags, if I wish to display on both sides of my entry gate?

    Reply
    1. Tibetan Nuns Project Post author

      The order should be left to right: blue, white, red, green, and yellow. Blue symbolizes the sky and space, white symbolizes the air and wind, red symbolizes fire, green symbolizes water, and yellow symbolizes earth. We hope that helps as you hang your prayer flags.

      Reply
    1. Tibetan Nuns Project Post author

      Dear Paul, Yes, you can hang prayer flags on your pack when you climb, but you might ensure that the flags do not touch the ground. In Dharamsala, home of His Holiness the Dalai Lama and near to the headquarters of the Tibetan Nuns Project, it is common to see prayer flags hung in the rear windows of cars and even across the handlebars of motorcycles. It is always important to treat prayer flags with respect and the intention to end the suffering of all sentient beings.

      Reply
  14. Lynne Kushner

    I am very excited to hang my prayer flags as I would like to begin sending my wishes to end suffering for sentient beings. Please tell me specifically when I can hang them. Thank you

    Reply
    1. Tibetan Nuns Project Post author

      Dear Lynne, you can hang prayer flags any time. As the blog states, Tibetans traditionally hang new prayer flags at Losar, Tibetan New Year, which this year falls on February 5 2019. However, you don’t need to wait to hang your prayer flags.

      Reply
  15. Divya

    I recently bought the prayer flags from a store that sells hand made stuff and support local artists. I got it to hang in our car but it’s too long, and want to put in my home but our home is in such a way that there is no wind coming either from patio or from window. Where can I hang it? Above the home temple or on the door at the entrance?

    Reply
    1. Tibetan Nuns Project Post author

      Dear Divya, Hanging prayer flags is respectful within itself. One of the goals is to spread their blessings outward so over the entrance might be good, but over the altar is good too. It really is about your intention and you have to work within your situation. Blessings to you.

      Reply
  16. Daniel

    Hi, I was happy to see that the nuns are making traditional cotton flags and not the synthetic fiber ones. However, is the rope they’re strung along also natural fiber? Unfortunately all the cotton flags I’ve found so far have been strung on nylon ropes which it’s near impossible to avoid burning along with the flags.

    Reply
    1. Tibetan Nuns Project Post author

      Thank you, Daniel. The prayer flags made by the nuns at Dolma Ling are strung on white cotton.

      Reply
    1. Tibetan Nuns Project Post author

      Dear Hazel, It’s best to hang the prayer flag somewhere high. It’s also best if it can flap in the breeze.

      Reply
  17. Charlotte Lanctot

    I saw it is important in which direction do you hang the prayer flags. I can’t find out which direction is good. Right now I have mine hanging in a southern direction in my bedroom window. Is it significant which direction you put it in

    Reply
    1. Tibetan Nuns Project Post author

      Dear Charlotte, Tibetan prayer flags are strung left to right in this specific order: blue, white, red, green, and yellow. There is no specific direction to hang them. Your southern-facing window is fine.

      Reply
  18. Mary Miller

    Hello,

    I have a dear friend who has died and spent most of her adult life in Nepal. I would like to honor her at her memorial by representing all of the people she touched but who can not attend the service. I had an idea but was not sure if it was appropriate. I wanted to present a set of prayer flags with the name of those who could not be there on it. I was not sure if that was disrespectful. If so is it ok to create pieces of colored fabric that has their names, mimicking a prayer flag? I do not want to be disrespectful but also want to honor my friend in a way she would enjoy or relate to. Thank you so much for your response. Mary Miller

    Reply
    1. Tibetan Nuns Project Post author

      Dear Mary, We are very sorry for the loss of your friend. Your wish to honor her in this special way sounds full of love and compassion, including for her friends who are unable to attend her memorial. In our actions, it is our intentions and thoughts that are important. While it would be disrespectful if you were to write the names on top of prayers on real Tibetan prayer flags, but your idea of mimicking prayer flags with colored fabric does not sound disrespectful. His Holiness the Dalai Lama has said, “The quality or purity of any spiritual practice is determined by the individual’s intention and motivation.” Wishing you every happiness, Mary.

      Reply
  19. Genevieve Floyed

    I wanted to put up new prayer flags as the ones I have now are now faded. The problem I have is that I live in a city that does not permit burning as it is very dry here and sunny. How should I dispose of them? I live in a desert so I am a bit lost.

    Reply
    1. Tibetan Nuns Project Post author

      Dear Genevieve, The best option may be for you to leave them up to fade away and disintegrate. You can always hang new ones along with the old ones. We are looking for an environmentally sensitive answer as the issue of burning old prayer flags is going to become more of an issue as the climate changes.

      Reply
  20. Margi Wood

    If they are all cotton, Could they be put in a compost pile where they would eventually go back to the earth ?

    Reply
  21. Debra

    Hello, I have lovely prayer flags which hang for a time and then one by one, come unfastened at one end and dangle, without touching the ground. Does this have any symbolic meaning? Should I remove the flag and respectfully burn it or simply reattach it? Thank you and blessings.

    Reply
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    1. Tibetan Nuns Project Post author

      Dear Mariellen, This is not a question we’ve encountered before, but your intention is what matters. Clearly, you are acting out of respect and you want to treat the prayers on the prayer flags with reverence, so provided that that is your motivation in adding the beads to the rope, then it is not disrespectful.

      Reply
  23. Vidhya

    Is it ok to hang Om Mani Pae Mey Hun flag high up in the bedroom wall.. We just want peace all over.. We mostly keep windows closed.. is it ok.. please advise

    Reply
    1. Tibetan Nuns Project Post author

      Yes, that would be fine Vidhya. Normally prayer flags are hung outdoors so the wind can carry the prayers, but intention is key and it is OK to hang them indoors also.

      Reply
  24. Anne

    Hello, our son passed away at the age of eleven. As a memorial to him we purchased prayer flags from a local Buddhist community, and adhered images cut from his many beloved T-shirts to the blank backs of the flags. We hang the flags from trees when we camp and attend music festivals; they are always carefully taken down at the end and stored in a special decorated cloth bag I created for the purpose. I love that we can see the images from his clothing (mostly natural-world images as he loved nature and animals) and that we can also see the prayer text/images. The flags give strangers an opportunity to ask what they are about and learn of our son, who was a generous, kind, and fair-minded spirit. Although of course we modified the flags with the best intentions and respect, I’m now wondering if what we did in adding the images/fabric of his shirts to the flags was actually disrespectful? I would like to know, since other bereaved parents have inquired how we did it, and if it would be better to use blank flags made in a different way (ie not blessed prayer flags) we would tell them that in future.

    Reply
    1. Tibetan Nuns Project Post author

      Dear Anne,
      We are deeply sorry for the loss of your son and send you our profound condolences. Your question about prayer flags is not one that we have encountered before. His Holiness the Dalai Lama has said, “The quality or purity of any spiritual practice is determined by the individual’s intention and motivation.” As this blog post says, “When raising prayer flags it is important to have a good motivation. One should not have selfish or limiting thoughts. When hanging prayer flags one should wish that all beings everywhere will benefit and find happiness.” You have written that, when hanging and taking down the prayer flags, you are handling them with respect and good intentions. Your wish is clearly to honor the memory of your beloved son and his generous, kind, and fair-minded nature. If other bereaved parents ask you about doing something similar, you may want to suggest that they create a separate set of flags to honor their lost child that they hang along with the Tibetan prayer flags. This way the prayers on the Tibetan prayer flags will be fully free to blow in the breeze and spread prayers and good wishes to all sentient beings. Traditionally, Tibetan prayer flags are hung up and kept hanging up with the air flowing through them. It’s ideal that they slowly disintegrate as this is a reflection of the prayers being sent out to the world.

      Reply
  25. Wendy

    Help. I was given a beautiful strand of prayer flags, but when I opened them today to hang (Tibetan New Year) I discovered they are too long for my deck! What can I do? How can I hang them?

    Reply
  26. Willow Campbell

    hello!
    i have recently purchased two sets of prayer flags, and was wondering how often i should be moving them around my altar? is there such thing as moving them too often?

    Reply
    1. Tibetan Nuns Project Post author

      Dear Willow, The main thing is one’s intention and treating the prayer flags with respect.

      Reply
  27. Mariusz

    Hello,
    I will be grateful for your answers to these two questions:
    1. The order of the flags (blue-white, etc.): if they are hung on a balcony, is this the view of them from the inside, or from the outside?
    2. I have read that there are mantras to be said while hanging up the flags, what are they?
    Lha gyal lo,
    Mariusz

    Reply
    1. Tibetan Nuns Project Post author

      Dear Mariusz, Thank you for your questions. Regarding the order of the prayer flags hung on a balcony, there’s no true rule for this. If you are hanging the prayer flags to make yourself happy, then you can have the prayers facing in toward you or you can face the prayers outwards to spread out to the world. Both work. Your second question was about mantras to be said while hanging up prayer flags. No, there is no consistent answer for this; not everyone does this. You can choose to say a mantra if you wish. Your intention is important. As you hang the prayer flags, wish that all beings be free of suffering and the causes of suffering. We hope to share a blog post soon about the mantra “OM MANI PADME HUM”.

      Reply
  28. Michelle Satya Ricci

    Hello and thank you!

    We have a long stretch to cover and are wondering a couple of things:

    Is it ok to string multiple prayer flags together to get the desired length – or would you custom make the flags to our desired length?

    Also when hanging. I understand the blue start on the left… my question would be on the left if I am facing downwind or upwind? Meaning if the wind blows West to East does the blue start in the North or South? Meaning when the wind blows through the flags are the flags facing the wind or facing where the wind blows? Meaning is the wind in my face or at my back when situating the blue flag to the left? I hope this is understandable 🙂

    Namo Namo

    Reply
    1. Tibetan Nuns Project Post author

      Dear Michelle, Yes it is totally fine to string multiple sets of prayer flags together and this is commonly done. You can string the prayer flags either way because the wind moves around and changes direction.

      Reply
  29. MIchelle

    Hello,

    I am hanging flags and I have about 5 feet left over. Do I reach for something else or double back and tie it unto itself, since it is not long enough to go the whole length back?

    Also when will you have more flags in stock Some that I am interested in are not available right now.

    In breath,
    Michelle

    Reply
    1. Tibetan Nuns Project Post author

      Dear Michelle, You can double back your prayer flags or tie it to something else. Either is fine. We hope to have more prayer flags in stock this summer so please check back. The problem is that under the coronavirus lockdown there are many factors causing delays. We have placed an order with the nuns at Dolma Ling, but it could be some time before they can obtain materials. Then they will need to sew the prayer flags and then travel to Delhi to ship all the products. All of those activities are prohibited by the virus and the lockdown. We’ll post updates on our Facebook page as soon as we hear more. Thank you so much for purchasing products made by the nuns.

      Reply
  30. Kimberly

    I am wondering if it would be disrespectful to incorporate prayer flag panels into a painting? I use mixed media to create paintings of a spiritual nature. When I paint, my practice is to first meditate, and then to create from that space, allowing the painting to spring forth from the concept that I am meditating on. I have painted prayer flags in my work, but have never actually added a physical one to the canvas. It would involve disassembling the prayer flags to remove one of the panels. Would this be disrespectful? As an alternative I was considering purchasing a traditional wooden block stamp of the windhorse or the medicine buddha (created by artists in nepal) and using that on the artwork instead. I am interested in your thoughts on this.

    Reply
    1. Tibetan Nuns Project Post author

      Dear Kimberley, There is no problem with incorporating a prayer flag into your art. The only possible issue is in handling the remainder of the original prayer flag in a respectful way, which is always a bit of a challenge.

      Reply
  31. Simone

    Hi, I recently hung my prayer flags, some are twisted right up on themselves.
    Should I unravel them or leave them be.?

    Reply
      1. Kim

        My prayer flags are doing the same thing, wrapping around the rope. I want to be able to see them all dancing in the wind but the middle ones are wrapped up! Is there anything I can do to prevent this from continuing to happen?

        Reply
        1. Tibetan Nuns Project Post author

          Is it possible that the rope is twisted or the prayer flags are curled up? If so, you might want to try ironing the prayer flags so that they lay more flat.

          Reply
  32. Amy

    I recently had vandalism to my prayer flags. They were cut, retied, flags cut from the strand then thrown on the ground, in my yard. What was left of them, in the tree, I brought inside. What is your suggestion to do with them? Any symbolism to pray upon? Thank you very much for suggestions

    Reply
    1. Tibetan Nuns Project Post author

      Dear Amy, We’re very sorry to hear that someone vandalized your prayer flags. If you have all of them, you can perhaps restring and rehang them, with a wish to free all beings from suffering and the causes of suffering. If you’re not able to re-hang them, then the best thing would be to burn them with respect.

      Reply
  33. Emma

    I am planning to move and am interested in taking my Windhorse prayer flags with me. Is there an appropriate way to store them for moving? If so, how should I take them down and put them back up?

    Reply
    1. Tibetan Nuns Project Post author

      Just remove them and re-hang the respectfully and make sure they do not touch the ground. When you pack them for the move, treat them with respect and care. Wishing you health and happiness in your new home!

      Reply
  34. Alanna Morgan

    Twice now my prayer flags have been taken by squirrels. I assume they are building their nests with them. This has always pleased me as it is benefitting them. What do you think of this way of disposing of prayer flags?

    Thank you.

    Reply
    1. Tibetan Nuns Project Post author

      Dear Alanna, We’re so sorry that you keep losing your prayer flags to squirrels. As you pointed out, this is a very unique way of disposing of them. Wishing you health and happiness. Thank you so much for supporting the nuns!

      Reply
  35. edwin

    What prayers or mantras should I do before hanging prayer flags….Im told they should be blessed before hanging …blessed rice et cetera!?

    Reply
    1. Tibetan Nuns Project Post author

      Dear Edwin, The prayer flags that we sell through the Tibetan Nuns Project online store are made and blessed by the Tibetan Buddhist nuns at Dolma Ling Nunnery and Institute in India. So they come to you, already having been blessed with prayers by the nuns. As you hang them, you should wish to end the suffering of all sentient beings. You can say a simple and powerful prayer such as the Om Mani Padme Hum mantra.

      Reply
  36. Alana Castillo

    Hi! I recently got beautiful prayer flags as a gift from my friend, I am a student in college and we are not allowed to hang items by the window (fire hazard) the best place I can hang them without it being a hazard is on my wall with the most sunlight.. is this appropriate ?

    Reply
    1. Tibetan Nuns Project Post author

      Dear Alana, Yes you can hang them on your wall. Normally they are hung outdoors so the prayers can be carried by the wind, but people do hang them inside too. One’s intention is important. As you hang them, wish that all beings will be free of suffering and the causes of suffering. Best of luck with your studies.

      Reply

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